Can your church handle hiring next gen

In my post yesterday I picked apart a youth pastor job opening  and referenced Millennials (20-30’s) and why this ad would not inspire them to apply. Here is a short blurb from the article.

Gutfreund says that Intelligence Group studies of millennials have found that:

·64% of them say it’s a priority for them to make the world a better place.

72% would like to be their own boss. But if they do have to work for a boss, 79% of them would want that boss to serve more as a coach or mentor.

88% prefer a collaborative work-culture rather than a competitive one.

74% want flexible work schedules.

·And 88% want “work-life integration,” which isn’t the same as work-life balance, since work and life now blend together inextricably.

Millennials are, in essence, “venture consumers,” Gutfreund says. They’re not looking to fill a slot in a faceless company, any more than a good venture capitalist is looking to toss money at a faceless startup. They’re looking strategically at opportunities to invest in a place where they can make a difference, preferably a place that itself makes a difference.

So, Pastor’s how will your church’s work style and  youth pastor ads adapt to this knew workforce or, will your church put it’s head in the ground and do nothing?   Since, Millennials are not good conformers, how will you create an environment where these young, hungry, world changers will thrive and make an impact for the gospel.

Here are a few questions and statements you can think through if you want to change the process and ultimately change the product.

·64% of them say it’s a priority for them to make the world a better place.

Does your church do community service projects? Emphasize it!

Is your vision big enough to attract someone who wants to make the world a better place?

Will you equip these young adults to make the world a better place? How?

How much freedom (important word to Millennials) will you give these potential employees to live out their dreams to make the world a better place?

72% would like to be their own boss. But if they do have to work for a boss, 79% of them would want that boss to serve more as a coach or mentor.

If you have a top down approach to staff you may want to change that.

What is your strategy for helping your staff get better?

How hands on (not micro-manging) are you with staff in solving problems?

Is your church prepared to create an inter-dependence that will let these kind of independent souls of shine?

88% prefer a collaborative work-culture rather than a competitive one.

This is a pet peeve of mine. I don’t expect Pastors to solve my problems with other ministries but conflict is a friction that slows the ministry down.

How competitive are the ministries in your church?

How are you helping all the ministries in your church get along or, better still, work together to accomplish big goals.

How do you reward people or teams for working together?

74% want flexible work schedules.

I am blessed to work in a church where my schedule is flexible. I am essentially my own boss but I don’t take that for granted.

If you’re requiring  people come to the office to work, why?

What has to be done at the church and what can be done anywhere?

What does time off look like?

How can you make your staff’s schedule more flexible?

How can you make your schedule more flexible?

·And 88% want “work-life integration,” which isn’t the same as work-life balance, since work and life now blend together inextricably.

If you hire a millennial, they want to work if the work is important. Boring work for anyone is a buzzkill but especially to this generation. They want to make a difference, so let them, at a pace that’s challenging but not overwhelming.

How can you create a schedule that allows these young go-getters to work and play at the same time?

The Christian life, like all other lives, has it’s ups and downs. How can you help disciple these “kids” to enjoy their work and their faith?

That’s are my two cents and I wish that some of the churches I’ve worked for would have  accepted it from me. It would have made my work/life experience that much better.

I have three kids who are millennials and I hope their bosses or supervisors will see their unique personalities as assets and not threats to their businesses or organizations. If you want to hire a millennial, stop trying to make them more like you and let them lead a little, play a little, work a little, and love a lot. It will change the way your church works, plays, and it’s perception in the community.

Check out this article for more advice on:

How to Effectively Recruit and Retain Millennials: Advice from General Assembly

Your Turn

Have you hired a millenial? What challenges has that presented? What blessing have you received?

What changes did you make, if any, to reach/hire a millenial?

If you’re a millenial who works in a church, what do you wish your bosses would get about you?

 

 

 

 

 

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